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05 June 2010

Book Review: The Little Giant of Aberdeen County by Tiffany Baker


Title: The Little Giant of Aberdeen County
Author: Tiffany Baker
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing; Reprint edition
Publication Date: January 25, 2010
Paperback: 368 pages
ISBN: 978-0446194228
Genre: Fiction

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From the Back of the Book:

Meet Truly Plaice-part behemoth, part witch, part Cinderella. Born larger than life into a small-minded town, Truly breaks her family into smithereens. Her mother dies during Truly's birth, and when her father follows shortly afterward, Truly and her dainty sister, Serena Jane, are destined for very different fates. As Truly grows larger and larger on a rundown farm, she watches lovely Serena Jane become the town's adored May Queen and the obsession of a local boy, Bob Bob Morgan--the youngest in a line of Aberdeen's doctors, who for generations wove their influence among the town's citizens. Yet no matter how far apart life propels them, Truly and her sister are forever linked. And Truly will find her future shaped by Serena Jane's relationships, the centuries-old antique of Doctor Morgan's, and the reality that love cannot be ordered to size.

My Review:

The Little Giant of Aberdeen County
by Tiffany Baker is a novel that immediately draws the reader into the quirky town of Aberdeen and its inhabitants. The reader's view of the town is from Truly who suffers repeated indignities and yet able to view the world through eyes of awe, love, and a deep understanding. Truly and her sister Serena Jane are complete opposites of each other yet their lives reflect the others in many ways throughout the novel. Besides Truly, who is indeed a champion, my favourite characters were Marcus and Amelia, both outcasts in their individual ways. I was immediately drawn into Aberdeen and found myself fiercely protective of, then quite proud of Truly and the Dyersons. I think people in situations such as the Dyersons often get looked down upon with no just reason and few bother to get to know them and Baker does an excellent job in showing the other side, what it is like to be Brenda, August and Amelia Dyerson. The dichotomy between the haves and the have nots is wonderfully portrayed in The Little Giant of Aberdeen County, between the Pickertons and the Dyersons, Miss Sparrow and Serena Jane, Bob Bob and Marcus. The Little Giant of Aberdeen County is a novel that will absorb the reader with the vivid descriptions, realistic characters and others become larger than life as the decades pass, scenarios true to life, and exquisite lessons told through fantastically written plots. I highly recommend The Little Giant of Aberdeen County and think it would be a brilliant discussion group choice.

About the Author:

Tiffany Baker lives in Tiburon, California with her husband and three children. This is her first novel.

I received a complimentary copy of The Little Giant of Aberdeen County by Tiffany Baker from Newman Communications, Inc as part of the tour. Receiving a copy in no way reflected my review of aforementioned novel.

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4 comments:

Jenn Calling Home said...

Happy SITs Saturday from another Jennifer in bloggy land. I'm curious. Have you finished The Brothers of Gwynedd? Any report/review? I need a good read for the summer.

Jennifer said...

Jenn,

I am reading The Brothers Gwynedd with a group, it is divided into four sections, and we are covering a section a month. Based on the first section I would recommend the book. My review is up for the first section with links to other reviews as well. My second review will be up this month. It is a delightfully long book.

I also would recommend Helen Hollick's Pendragon Trilogy.

Jennifer

Aths said...

Glad you liked this! I have this one sitting on my shelf.. I need to get to it soon!

Anna Marie said...

I've had my eye on The Little Giant of Aberdeen County for a while. Your description says part-witch. Is there a thread of magic running through the book like in Sarah Addison Allen's Sugar Queen?